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  We think that we can continue to pollute until we run out of fossil fuels or until a cleaner source of energy comes along, and then we can clean it all up and everything will be fine. Christians do not have a great track record when it comes to taking care of the environment.


Weekly Reflection: Pastor Dana Reardon
June 5, 2006

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Mom was right: We must clean up after ourselves

When I was learning to bake with my mother, who is much neater and more organized than I am always taught me to clean up as I went along.  I have to confess that I have never done that.  I love to bake, but the kitchen is a disaster when I am done.  But it is really OK, as long as my mother does not have to see it.  It all gets cleaned up and there is no permanent damage to the kitchen.

Likewise with housework.  I figure that I can dust half as often and get just as much dust.  Or I can do a whole day's dishes instead of each meal.  Neater people do not deal well with that concept.  But the dishes get done and no one gets sick and it is all fine.

The problem is when our society adopts, as we have, my "I can clean up later" attitude when it comes to caring for the creation God has given us.

We think that we can continue to pollute until we run out of fossil fuels or until a cleaner source of energy comes along, and then we can clean it all up and everything will be fine.

Christians do not have a great track record when it comes to taking care of the environment.  We turn to the Genesis story and point out that God has given us dominion over the earth. Some Christians just think that whatever we do is OK because Christ is returning soon.  Some might even hope that the mess we are in will bring the second coming closer.

But we conveniently forget that we are given this creation as stewards, not as owners.  And we certainly weren't hired as the demolition crew that we seen to have become.

We have to rethink it all.  We have to be still and hear the voice of God when we make all of our decisions, when we vote and when we buy a car and when we think about how big our houses need to be or how high the heat.  In all of the big and little decisions we are called to be good stewards.

We need to be more like my mom in this and not make big messes with the assumption that we can clean them all up later. 

The work of God is creation and more through Christ it is recreation, it is redemption.  I do believe that God has and will redeem us and calls us to be a part of that work.

Lord,  We thank you for the gift of you incredible creation.  May we learn to live in harmony with it and with your will.  Amen

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Copyright 2006, The Rev. Dana Reardon. All rights reserved. Used by permission. Email her at mspastor@aol.com.



The Rev. Dana Reardon is pastor at St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church, Warwick, RI.  A lifelong Lutheran, she came to ordained ministry after 21 years in nursing, mostly in pediatric intensive care.  She graduated from Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia in 1998 and served 4 years in Upstate New York before becoming a New Englander.  She is still trying to understand the accent.  While in the Upstate New York Synod she chaired the Stewardship Team.  That began her fascination with what makes stewards -- and more, what makes for generosity. She has three amazing daughters: Pastor Reardon says much of what she knows of life she learned from them.